Yacht charter
trends, events
and news

Ed Hamilton &
Company

Return
to the
Newsletter


Return
to the
Charter
Connection
archives
page


An article written by our staff and featured in The Charter Connection

THREE GREAT ITINERARIES FOR A CROATIA CHARTER


Chartering in Croatia gets more popular every year. These itineraries will make sure you get the best from your charter.
The Split to Dubrovnik route can obviously be reversed and can be adapted for a Dubrovnik start and finish.

Many crewed boats chartering here are not based in Croatia. The government allows them to charter providing either the starting or finishing port is outside the country. In this case we would suggest starting or finishing in Montenegro to the south or for longer charters or larger boats, possibly Venice or Trieste (Italy) in the north.

Ask us - we would be happy to give you boat and customized itinerary suggestions!


SPLIT TO SPLIT - THE SOUTHERN ROUTE. 7 nights.

The Roman Palace at SplitDay 1. Embark at Split and take an afternoon sail across to Milna, on the island of Brac.
Split is the largest Dalmatian city and dates back to the 6th century BC. The waterfront is dominated by the Roman Palace, built in the 3rd century.

Milna is a typical island village on the western side of Brac. It is a popular nautical resort, famous for its authentic Dalmatian restaurants.

Day 2. Sail from Milna to the Pakleni Islands off Hvar, for lunch. Continue on to Vis for the night.
The Pakleni Islands form a necklace of forested islets, with many small beaches and numerous hidden bays.

The island of Vis was inhabited in Neolithic times, three thousand years BC.

The Blue Grotto is a cave that can be entered from the sea. On calm sunny days around midday, the sun’s rays are reflected through the underwater entrance creating a blue light.


Day 3. Leave Vis for Lastovo.
Lastovo consists of 46 islands. The largest island in the municipality is also named Lastovo, as is the largest town. The local people are mainly fishermen so this is a perfect place to enjoy fresh sea food. This is a popular area for scuba divers, due to its rich underwater life and sunken ships from past times.

Day 4. Lastovo to Korcula.
With its abundant culture and history, Korcula is often called ‘Little Dubrovnik’. A romantic promenade runs through the town by the city walls, teeming with lively cafes.

Day 5. Leave Korcula for the town of Jelsa, on the island of Hvar.
Jelsa has grown from a small fishing village to a popular nautical destination. From this beautiful small town, you can walk through pinewoods along the coast or stroll through picturesque, well preserved villages.

Day 6. Sail from Jelsa to the ancient town of Bol, on the island of Brac. After lunch, continue on to the town of Hvar.
Situated on the southern coast, Bol is the oldest town of Brac and one of the most famous seaside resorts of the Adriatic. Apart from cultural monuments, Bol also has many beautiful beaches. The most famous is Zlatni Rat, which stretches into the open sea in the shape of a tongue, with its tip moving from side to side, depending on the direction of winds and waves.

Hvar is often called the "Santorini" of Croatia due to its much photographed Venetian architecture. It offers a pleasant mix of culture and plenty of vibrant restaurant and café life.

Day 7. Spend the morning in Hvar, then sail to Trogir.
Trogir is a charming small town situated on a peninsula connected to the mainland by a bridge. The town center is full of historical sites, narrow cobbled streets and stone houses. Trogir is also known for its night life.

Day 8. Leave Trogir early for the sail back to Split.




SPLIT TO SPLIT - THE NORTHERN ROUTE. 7 nights.

Day 1. Embark at Split and take an afternoon sail to Trogir.
Trogir is an interesting town, full of cultural and historical monuments, art collections, original architecture and fascinating alleyways.

Day 2. Sail from Trogir to Primosten.
Primosten is set on a little island, surrounded by seven smaller islands. Five centuries ago, the inhabitants built a causeway to link the island to the mainland and extend their farmland. The stone houses, churches and narrow lanes are a perfect harmony of the past and the present. This is possibly one of the most attractive places to visit in the whole of the Adriatic.

Day 3. Leave Primosten and overnight in Skradin.
Skradin is the headquarters of the Krka National Park. This is a spacious, largely unchanged region containing one or more preserved or insignificantly altered ecosystems. Skradin is an old town (2nd c. BC) close to the Krka river and represents the center of life from the early ancient times. Nearby Visovac Lake and its Franciscan monastery sits between two wonderful waterfalls, Skradinski Buk and Roski Slap.

Day 4. Skradin to Zut.
The island of Zut is part of the Kornati Archipelago and lies between the islands of Pasman and Kornat. This is where the fishing trade in Croatia began but today there are no permanent settlements on the island. Beautifully cultivated meadows and hillsides are rich with Mediterranean vegetation, vineyards and olive trees. There are more than 300 species of flora and equally rich fauna, and the undersea world has more than 250 plant and 300 animal species.

Day 5. Leave Zut for Telascica.
Thanks to its exceptionally valuable plant and animal life, and interesting archaeological heritage, Telascica became protected in 1980 as a Nature Park. It has three main attractions.
The unique bay of Telascica includes 25 small bays and 69 km of well-indented coastline. It is one of the safest, most beautiful havens in the Adriatic. The cliffs on the island of Dugi Otok, known as 'Stene', rise up to 200 m above the sea level, falling vertically to 90 m below the sea level. Lastly, the salt lake known as 'Mir' has curative characteristics.

Day 6. From Telascica, sail to Kaprije.
The island of Kaprije was named after the Mediterranean plant kapara (caper - green buds of a plant, used pickled). It is surrounded by hills of which the highest is Velika glavica (132m). Besides agriculture, the inhabitants are known for their fishing and seamanship skills, as well as their hospitality.

Day 7. Sail from Kaprije to Maslinica on the island of Solta.
Maslinica village lies in a picturesque cove at the western part of Solta. Beautiful scenery, with pinewoods on the southern side, the cove is protected from all but the northwest and is a popular anchorage for smaller yachts. Chief occupations include farming, wine production, olive growing, fruit growing, fishing and tourism.


Day 8. Leave Solta early for the sail back to Split.




SPLIT TO DUBROVNIK. 7 nights.

Day 1. Embark at Split and take an afternoon sail across to Milna, on the island of Brac.
Split is the largest Dalmatian city and dates back to the 6th century BC. The waterfront is dominated by the Roman Palace, built in the 3rd century.

Milna is a typical island village on the western side of Brac. It is a popular nautical resort, famous for its authentic Dalmatian restaurants.

Day 2. Sail from Milna to the Pakleni Islands, off Hvar.
Hvar has some lovely Venetian architecture, so is sometimes called the "Santorini" of Croatia. Besides its cultural attractions, it also offers plenty of great restaurants and lively cafes.


Day 3. Leave Hvar for Vis.
The island of Vis was inhabited in Neolithic times, three thousand years BC. Previously off limits to tourists as an army base (1945- 1989) it has now emerged from this isolation, full of untouched natural beauty.

The town of Komia is in a deep bay, with long pebble beaches (Gusarica, Nova Posta, Velo Zalo). There are a number of cultural and historic sites, a monastery and a fortress. There is a strong fishing community and fish and other seafood are traditionally served daily.


Day 4. Vis to Korcula.
Known as ‘Little Dubrovnik’, Korcula is full of lively cafes, culture and history. The town is also claimed to be the birth place of Marco Polo.

Day 5. Leave Korcula for the island of Mijet.
Polace is primarily a farming and fishing village on the north western coast of Mljet. The harbor is protected by a range of small, unpopulated islands (Moracnik, Tajnik, Kobrava, Ovrata). The Mljet lakes are also close by.

Day 6. Sail from Mijet to Sipan.
Sipan is sometimes called the Golden Island. It is the largest and most populated of the Elaphite (Elafit) Islands. The strong cultural tradition has produced an enormous number of monuments, over thirty churches, several monasteries, and over sixty Gothic and Renaissance summer residences of the well-to-do. When you've had enough culture, you can wander along miles of paths, just by yourself.

Day 7. Leave Sipan for Dubrovnik.
Dubrovnik is one of the most attractive and famous cities of the Mediterranean. The old part of the city, within the original walls, is full of churches, boutiques, open air restaurants, statues and small squares, all set around lovely pale stone streets.

Day 8. Disembark in the morning.

We would like to thank Helena Catipovic, of Fortuna Cruising for her assistance and some of these photographs.


Return to the Newsletter

Return to the Charter Connection Past Articles home page

How to contact us


Ed Hamilton & Company
24B US Route 1, Edgecomb, ME 04556

Call Toll Free
1-800-621-7855 in the U.S. & Canada
Tel (207) 882-7855 / Fax (207) 882-7851

  Request charter information
Contact us via
email